Images from the James Webb Space Telescope

NASA and its partner space agencies unveiled a stunning series of images – from the Carina Nebula in our own Milky Way to a much more distant galaxy cluster – taken by the James Webb Space Telescope, the largest and most powerful space observatory ever launched. The photo below shows Stephan’s quintet, five galaxies, four of which are interacting with their gravitational forces and stretching each other.

Webb’s first image of the Southern Ring Nebula, a dying star emitting gas and dust, in orbit with a younger star.

The Webb Telescope image of galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 includes thousands of galaxies, including the faintest objects ever observed in the infrared. The light from the faintest and most distant galaxies in this image is about 13.1 billion years old.

A mid-infrared version of Webb’s first image of the Southern Ring Nebula.

In April 2020, work was being carried out on the James Webb Space Telescope at Northrop Grumman in California.

The telescope’s image of galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 includes thousands of galaxies, including the faintest objects ever observed in the infrared. The light from SMACS 0723 in the image below is 4.6 billion years old.

Larkin Carey, an optical engineer, examined two test mirror segments for the James Webb Space Telescope on a prototype at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, in 2014.

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